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AI Law & Ethics Conference - 28/02/2019 - Leuven

 

Registration open

Register here (This event is fully booked)

Recent advancements in data science have led to the development of cyber-physical spaces where humans and machines evolve together. AI is increasingly being ‘delivered’ through an ever-growing number of consumer and industrial platforms (e.g. transport and healthcare platforms). The ‘platformisation’ of AI raises multilevel legal and ethical challenges regarding the platform itself, its customers, contributors and end-users. This conference focuses on these challenges from the assumption that the emerging global AI platforms should be ‘interoperable’ not only at technical but even more so at legal and ethical level.

 

Programme

9:00-9:30 Registration

9:30-9:45
Welcome: Prof. Marie-Christine Janssens, Head of CiTiP, KU Leuven (BE)

9:45-10:30
Keynote : Law, Technology and Society: Reimagining the Regulatory Environment
Prof. Roger Brownsword, King’s College London (UK)

10:30-12:00
The Gatekeeping of Data, Propertisation and Markets

  • Data as an essential AI resource in times of converging legal frameworks

  • Propertisation, a tool for rebalancing power asymmetries in the digital economy?

  • Building new regulatory infrastructures: between the carrot and the stick

Panel - Speakers:
Christian D'Cunha, EDPS (EU)
Prof. Björn Lundqvist, Stockholm University (SE)  
Dr. Sonja Zillner, Siemens (DE)
Dr. Christoph Lange-Bever, Fraunhofer (DE)
Moderator: Natalie Bertels, KU Leuven (BE)

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-14:30
Public and Private AI Platforms: Trust-Building Allocation of Responsibility and Liability

  • AI Platforms as Critical Infrastructure: A Shared Responsibility of State and non-State Actors?

  • AI Platforms as Socio-Technical Systems: Allocation of Liability in Distributed Environments

  • AI Platforms as Testing Grounds: Smart Regulatory and Governance Sandboxes

Panel - Speakers:
Prof. Christoph Busch, University of Osnabrück (DE)
Wim Dewaele, The Beacon (BE)
Dr. Merel Noorman, TILT (NL)
Nathalie Smuha, European Commission (EU)
Moderator: Ivo Emanuilov, KU Leuven (BE)

14:30-15:15
Keynote: What’s in an AI Platform: AI Between Commons and Global Public Goods?
Prof. Geert Van Calster, KU Leuven (BE)

15:15- 15:45 Coffee Break

15:45-17:15
Global AI Platforms and (International) Morality: Facilitators of the Human-Machine Co-evolution
Panel - Speakers:
Prof. Hendrik Blockeel, KU Leuven (BE)
Prof. Jo Pierson, VUB University Brussels (BE)  
Carlos Alvarez-Pereira, Innaxis (ES)
Lorelien Hoet, Microsoft (BE)
Moderator: Prof. Peggy Valcke, KU Leuven (BE)

17:15-17:30
Closing remarks: ‘Platformisation’ of AI: Global Governance or Techno-Regulation?
Prof. Peggy Valcke, KU Leuven (BE)

17:30-18:30 Cocktail and Networking
 

Download the programme here

 

Registration (limited seats available)

Register here 

  • 240 euro (Business)
  • 180 euro (Agoria members)
  • 160 euro (Fulltime Academics & Public Sector)

OVB Permanente Vorming: 6 punten

Special discount (20%) on Prof. Roger Brownsword's new book 'Law, Technology and Society: Reimagining the Regulatory Environment'.

Image result for Law, Technology and Society: Reimagining the Regulatory Environment

 

About

From self-driving cars, unmanned aircraft and ships, through connected home appliances and service robots, to personalised healthcare and precision medicine, the emergence of more and complex autonomous systems has given rise to a number of very hard, sensitive and even existential questions. While artificial intelligence (AI), and machine learning for that matter, have existed for several decades already, recent advancements in data science driven by the widespread availability of data and increasing computational power, have led to the development of cyber-physical spaces where humans and machines evolve together.

 

Data allows for increased personalisation of the standards against which human behaviour is evaluated, oftentimes in peril of abolishing the legal protections dealing with the power asymmetries between individuals and companies. AI is increasingly being ‘delivered’ through an ever-growing number of consumer and industrial platforms (e.g., transport and healthcare platforms) developed and supported by stakeholders acting at different levels and in different capacities. These platforms go far beyond simple aggregation of data to provide access to advanced AI capabilities linking platform users’ needs with tailor-made solutions.

 

The ‘platformisation’ of AI raises multilevel legal and ethical challenges regarding the platform itself, its customers, contributors and end-users. The growing market power of such platforms engenders economic and competition concerns. They are exacerbated by the fact that such platforms could be supported or even managed or supervised by governmental actors, such as international organisations. In such multi-stakeholder environments with distributed agency and cascade delegation, the governance and allocation of responsibility and liability is becoming increasingly difficult. AI platforms could form part of critical infrastructure with direct implications on the manner in which a State would discharge its obligations and international responsibility to protect its citizens. The clear delineation of the different actors’ obligations in such platforms is even more challenging in light of the uncertain legal status of data, machine learning models and other types of ‘smart property’.

 

The convergence of public and private interests in these (global) ‘one-stop-shop’ platforms of the future reinforces the question of whether AI should be treated as a ‘global public good’ or commons. If so, could we seek ‘legal interoperability’ with the regimes applicable to other global commons, such as the polar regions, the atmosphere and outer space? The search for an adequate governance model is all the more challenging in light of the co-evolution of humans and machines triggering new ethical concerns resonating with the basic question of the content of (international) morality.

 

This conference focuses on these challenges from the assumption that the emerging global AI platforms should be ‘interoperable’ not only at technical but even more so at legal and ethical level. It aims to explore whether this goal could be attained through a commonly agreed (global) governance model, how to build trust in an increasingly uncertain technological and political environment, and how to align the development and co-evolution of these platform with the sustainable development goals of human society.

 

Venue

Martin's Klooster Hotel
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwstraat 18
3000 Leuven
BELGIUM

 

Contact

KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law (CiTiP)
Tel: 32 16 32 52 73

Email: CiTiP Admin
http://www.law.kuleuven.be/citip

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